Evolution of the Interview Process

Gerry Crispin of CareerXroads literally rocked my world at my annual Career Thought Leaders conference in Baltimore, Maryland with his information on the way technology is evolving – and maybe evolving isn’t even the right word – the interviewing process.

If you haven’t really given thought to how technology might impact your next interview, you might be shocked to learn what “could” be awaiting you. Here are a few of his most notable comments. My thoughts on his comments can be found in this month’s column in Futures in Finance.

- The next wave of technology innovation will destroy more jobs than it creates.

–   HR data will be collected, analyzed, and the results deployed in real time, most often poorly.

- Video interviewing will create seamless conversations via technology that will dramatically change the hiring landscape.

–   And what about Sophie?

There are a lot of issues that technology brings into the search and interview process; and certainly at this point, we have more speculation and questions than answers. Here’s a given. Video interviewing is only going to increase in popularity if only because, once again, it gives the interviewer the upper hand and lowers recruiting costs.

Interview Evolution

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One Response to Evolution of the Interview Process

  1. Cindy – Great article and insights. I am curious the types of companies where this type of interviewing are going to be taking place. What is the likelihood that a small-medium sized entity with a local, or perhaps regional, outreach is going to employ such practices?

    Maybe I haven’t fully embraced the concepts, but I see this type of practice being limited to the national, multinational firms, or large businesses that are growing into a national company that are looking for talent outside of its geographic area. I think the practice will even be limited to the location of the company. I could see it happening in Dallas, New York, LA, Miami; but I couldn’t see this happening in small metropolitan areas.

    What are your thoughts?

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